W11 le étranger & reflection.

How can lacuna be visually explored and represented in the context of public human interaction? Gathering stimulation from the film, sound and comedic techniques of 20th century satirists, depict the empty space we see in the learned tension of societal communication. Continue reading “W11 le étranger & reflection.”

W10 Filming and finalising Task 2.

Taking our ideas from the last meeting, we’ve decided to take off by sketching out a storyboard with our concept.

Basis of the concept:

Two squares framing two different scenes within one rectangle boundary of black space. A relationship blooms from stranger to close friends while simultaneously showing each brush stroke drawn for every time they become closer. Each brush stroke would be in a certain colour; starting off with pale grey, to navy blue to bright yellow as the result of a closer relationship formed. Continue reading “W10 Filming and finalising Task 2.”

W9 Sequence Exegesis: The Science of Sleep.

The Science of Sleep can be summed up a film that revolves around the story of a man, Stephane, moving to a new place and having different life experiences such as how he feels about his job and his relationships with people. He takes his horrible life experiences and reflects on them every time by warping himself during his sleep and into his own world of craft and imagination. Through this reflection, he is able to do what he can’t do in real life, such as screaming at his boss and giving the love letter to Stephanie (his neighbour). He gets paranoid of turning his imaginary actions to life as the film progresses further. These struggles are reflected in a way they are exaggerated in all scenes of his imagination. Continue reading “W9 Sequence Exegesis: The Science of Sleep.”

W8 Experiment for Task 2.

Our group approach to planning Task 2 was to decide our roles, experiment and create a storyboard together. We’ve discussed that it’d be best if we all gathered together and focused on filming together so clashes of different ideas wouldn’t happen and everyone would have an experience with every role as we weren’t particularly strict on what we wanted to do. As part of the aim this week, we were to build a base storyboard to get us started on what we wanted to film.

Continue reading “W8 Experiment for Task 2.”

W7 Sound as a visual – Artikulation.

How people pick up and understand sound is varied in so many ways depending on when they started being deaf. A way to visualise sound to deaf people is through the use of rhythm, shape and colours. An example of a well-known form of visualisation is the Synesthesia. According to Baron-Cohen & Harrison 1997, “Synesthesia is a process whereby one sense is used to interpret and give meaning to information garnered through another sense” It is the act of translating sound to sight. Continue reading “W7 Sound as a visual – Artikulation.”

W6 3 scenes (group work) and experimental imagery and film with textures.

During STUVAC, there was a huge focus on getting our concept concreted. Our group wanted to push more into the idea of our initial idea “invisible space” so that lead to “interactions between people and the unspoken feelings between strangers (Anxiety)” to be our main concept. Continue reading “W6 3 scenes (group work) and experimental imagery and film with textures.”

Reflection – Final Video

 

Our new Research Question: How can lacuna be visually explored and represented in the context of public human interaction? Gathering stimulation from the film, sound and comedic techniques of 20th century satirists, depict the empty space we see in the learned tension of societal communication.

 

Answer: Inspired by the works of Charlie Chaplin and Jacques Tati, we’ve decided to use a blank studio space and simplistic props to convey the cautious and stunted nature of strangers interacting. Through instructing our actors on what to do and how to act we explored aspects of artificiality driven with our uses of glitches and hand movements mimic the the artificial scenes you see on TV. Minimalistic sound and color, along with static camera angles and no dialogue force the viewer to engage in the awkwardness of the situation and be consumed by at times the uncomfortable humor. We developed our ideas by viewing human interaction and then choreographing one of our own, dramatizing the rigidity and anxiety seen in our actors’ body language. The box is symbolic of the unspoken gaps between strangers; neither party address, but both are aware it is there leaving the boundaries of human interactions and personal space ignored.

 

Above is our final film and research question and answer. We went through a lot of challenges personally and as a team to reach our end point that we are all happy with.

We all started with definitions of lacuna that all shared the common theme of exploring human interaction, but the way in which we  depicted  this kept evolving. The use of each individuals research was crucial. We all discussed techniques in the presentation such as mine being silt scan photography and movement of people which came in use later on.

We went from a concept that didn’t have much grounding. We wanted to originally invade the  privacy of random people and relate it back to there use of personal space in a public area.  We hit a road block when we got out there and started filming as you could tell with our research video in a earlier blog post. We struggled to get intimate snips of people as it was very invasive and hard to film in a organic type of way that didn’t look forced or rehearsed.  After talking to Mel he came up with the idea of relating our concept to “wasted space” potentially exploring all the wasted houses or abounded buildings here in Sydney. It was quite ironic as after researching this it became apparent that people are searching for space in Sydney. We thought the idea of wasted space and people could be closely linked as every space we visited or filmed always had a strong human interaction related to it. After our research for this we decided as a team we would go into a different direction. We would use studio space to film our actors. After talking with Ella we were inspired by European satirists. After surveying their film techniques we decided we had enough footage to manipulate our film into a to strip of  choreographed interaction of strangers in  a studio.

This subject taught me a great deal it taught me discipline and patience is importance when working with a team. I learnt from Mel and Ella to not always think so literal and be able to trust in the process of exploring as sometimes when you get out there and film or create things just happen and fall into place. The research behind everything you do is important but I learnt not to be limited by my research questions as I may end up not finding a answer to my question and thats okay.

I am very happy that we stayed together as a group and finished the process together as much like a work environment you need to stick to your commitments.

After all of this Ella and Mel mentioned a film ” Sometimes makingSomething leads to nothing ” (Mexico City 1997.Paradox of Praxis 1.).  For more than 9 hours Alÿs pushed a block of ice through the streets of Mexico City until it completely melted.  For hours he struggled to pull a large block of ice with all his strength till the very end of the video the ice was so small it could almost melt away.

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Although this short film doesn’t have any visual or conceptual relation to out final task. It really helped me in trusting the process of film making and not being strict or controlling the ending you wanted but learning alot in the process.  I throughly enjoyed my time in Lost in Lacuna Lab b.

Assessment Task 3: Professional Practice

How can lacuna be visually explored and represented in the context of public human interaction? Gathering stimulation from the film, sound and comedic techniques of 20th century satirists, depict the empty space we see in the learned tension of societal communication.

Answer: Inspired by the works of Charlie Chaplin and Jacques Tati, we’ve decided to use a blank studio space and simplistic props to convey the cautious and stunted nature of strangers interacting. Through instructing our actors on what to do and how to act we explored aspects of artificiality driven with our uses of glitches and hand movements mimic the artificial scenes you see on TV. Minimalistic sound and colour, along with static camera angles and no dialogue force the viewer to engage in the awkwardness of the situation and be consumed by at times the uncomfortable humour. We developed our ideas by viewing human interaction and then choreographing one of our own, dramatizing the rigidity and anxiety seen in our actors’ body language. The box is symbolic of the unspoken gaps between strangers; neither party address, but both are aware it is there leaving the boundaries of human interactions and personal space ignored.

Our project has really developed from our original intentions. As you can see from the progression of our blog posts, our goal has always been to explore human interaction, but our tools for depicting this have changed drastically.

I think the first standout has been the utilisation of studio space. We originally wanted to invade the privacy of random persons in order to survey their use of public space, reflecting upon how the viewer would feel as they interrupted their private space, despite the communal setting?

Hence, the organic nature of our project made filming difficult, and it was hard to find a concise aesthetic. Furthermore, we felt like there was very little space to explore the photographic and conceptual ideals from other film artists.

So, we moved on to our next idea. Using architecture and ‘wasted space’, we wanted to portray the importance of lacuna in design, and the irony behind terms such as ‘waste’ when talking about design (and then how this is symbolic of human interaction). When building houses, buildings, temples, workplaces etc., it’s impractical and dysfunctional to utilise every space; there is clarity and order in the blank spaces. So too does this apply to the physical and relational gaps between strangers. Boundaries, although negative at times (which we also aimed to explore. E.g. mega mansions) create a sense of safety and control.

However, this idea became too literal. Filming churches and gaps in architecture was going to be too difficult to evolve into a study of human relations. BUT it did directly feed into our final idea, so was definitely not a waste! And our original imagery of this provoked our clean, clear aesthetic.

So, we took a step back decide to look into European satirists. After surveying their film techniques and comedy styling, we decided to strip our film to a choreographed interaction in a studio. Particularly, (as seen in blog post before) Charlie Chaplin and Jacques Tati. We were inspired by their use of silence and non-diegetic sound. The orchestral tones are really vital to setting the mood, so we didn’t include any diegetic noises from our actual filming, but manipulated the bass guitar give an unnatural feel to our work.

Our two strangers were told to interact in a certain way in each clip. Our choreography revolved around the box, which served as our lacuna. The lacuna we explored (as seen in our concept statement) was the societally enforced rules around human interaction (hence, localised to first-world western situation). Their movements are stunted, and often unresponsive to the others situation.

The glitches are representative of communication breakdowns, and the constant fear of not conforming in the right way to social norms. (See glitches below)

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We also loved the way the camera stayed stagnant in a lot of Tati’s work, so the viewer focused even more heavily on each movement and expression of the human subject. His jolted and cautious manor builds awkwardness, making us laugh nervously as we’re unsure as to what he’ll do next. We hope to evoke these same awkward giggles from our audience, as they feel the pain of rigidity in the intermingling of our strangers.

Finally, our work forced our actors to move their bodies in unusual ways, creating a sense of vulnerability between us and them. Even the scratching of ones neck is not usually a public act, and as we sat and filmed, the level of self-awareness increased with the silence. Our collaboration has not always been smooth sailing, and out development of ideas has been long and slow, but we’re really excited with our final results. Our final video is below:

Final Video/Reflection || WEEK 11

How can lacuna be visually explored and represented in the context of public human interaction? Gathering stimulation from the film, sound and comedic techniques of 20th century satirists, depict the empty space we see in the learned tension of societal communication.

Inspired by the works of Charlie Chaplin and Jaques Tati, we’ve decided to use a blank studio space and simplistic props to convey the cautious and stunted nature of strangers interacting. Minimalistic sound and colour, along with static camera angles and no dialogue force the viewer to engage in the awkwardness of the situation. We developed our ideas by viewing human interaction and then choreographing one of our own, dramatising the rigidity and anxiety seen in our actors’ body language. The box is symbolic of the unspoken gaps between strangers; neither party address, but both are aware it is there.


Taking onbaord the constructive feedback from both the tutors and our peers last week, I believe that we were able to finesse our final video into it’s highest potential in regards to the given time frame. We added in some uses of sounds that attempted to explore the moods/themes of waiting, anxiety and discomfort – which were all themes we were really attempting to portray throughout the entire video such as the constant picking of a off-key guitar string. We color graded the video in order to keep the color palette and settings as similar as possible to each scene in order to create a cohesive color palette, and we cropped the video into a square on a black background – very similar to the works of Jacques Tati where it was displayed in a square frame. I learned how to add in a glitch effect, and we thought that since glitches was a technique that we had researched and explored in the earlier weeks within our research, that we could incorporate it within the final video for conceptual and visual effect. The conceptual effect being that we wanted the final video to look almost like a random channel flickering on the television, similar to French comedy television shows such as the ones of Jacques Tati. As human interactions are sometimes forced or sometimes natural, since Sagar and Lanny (in the video) were instructed by us on what to do, it explores the almost choreographed/forced nature of human interactions, whether it be with strangers or friends and family members, almost like a show. And how we choose to react to human interactions between strangers and loved ones is solely up to us as individuals, therefore, altering our future human interactions with others and our situations in life (e.g. Lanny ignoring Sagar falling down whilst she is sitting on the cube – the choosing of ignorance from strangers – we establish people as strangers through the lack of human interactions with certain people).

Final Week of Film Planning

We had a massive week this week in the lead up to our last class before the assessment is due. We’ve gotten lost with our direction at times (as I’m sure you’ll remember from our class discussion!) But Karina and Sunny put in a lot of work filming, and we’re really happy with the results, so are going to put in 110% of our efforts to turn the footage into a really raw film with a concise objective.

Below are the screen shots of original footage from this week:

Ella mentioned the comical side to our film, how the awkwardness/tension leads to humour, so we’ve looked into the film styles of French satirists Jaques Tati and René Goscinny. We’ve also been re-thinking our assessment question: it’s now less of a research into human movement/interaction, but rather a comical commentary of private people in public spaces.

The following screen shots are from the Kitchen Scene from Mon Oncle by Jaques Tati. It depicts him interacting with a modern kitchen, struggling to turns things on, dropping items, and so on. His inquisitions are always deliberate but innocent, and I think that’s what makes this scene so funny. The camera does not move, and I think that our film really bounces of this idea of minimalism to highlight a clear focal point.

The next images are from Charlie Chaplin’s work, The Lion’s Cage. Mr Chaplin is all about body movement and facial expression, putting himself into tense situations, and dramatizing his responses to a comedic level. This fragment of film is very fast paced, but slows down in moments of tension. The camera deliberately reveals to the audience what Charlie sees as he sees it (i.e. the fact that he’d run into a lions cage) giving us his immediately dramatized and comical response upon realisation. As a group, we can’t get enough of the body movements Charlie Chaplain employs, and how the direction and wideness of his eyes convey so much. Although the music is classical, it’s a really important study for us to understand the different methods that create tension and reprieve

Our new Research Question: How can lacuna be visually explored and represented in the context of public human interaction? Gathering stimulation from the film, sound and comedic techniques of 20th century satirists, depict the empty space we see in the learned tension of societal communication.
Answer: Inspired by the works of Charlie Chaplin and Jaques Tati, we’ve decided to use a blank studio space and simplistic props to convey the cautious and stunted nature of strangers interacting. Minimalistic sound and colour, along with static camera angles and no dialogue force the viewer to engage in the awkwardness of the situation. We developed our ideas by viewing human interaction and then choreographing one of our own, dramatizing the rigidity and anxiety seen in our actors’ body language. The box is symbolic of the unspoken gaps between strangers; neither party address, but both are aware it is there.

We also met up last night to re-format the order of our project, and what pieces of film we’re going to use. We feel a lot more confident about the flow of the film. Sarah and I also used instruments to form abstract sounds (influenced by Luigi’s work!) i.e. playing the bass out of tune/tuning it as we played, isolating different sounds on the drum, and getting a drummer to watch our piece and play along with it, forming stunted rhythms and sounds. We then are manipulating these sounds, we were really pleased with the way the drums (namely, high hats/symbols) sounded when slowed down and played backward.

Hence, our final steps involve editing the colour aesthetic on after affects, making the picture clearer and brighter. We also need to place the musical sounds where they belong. We have used cuts of footage interrupting other footage to stunt the flow of our piece, so are excited to aid that with percussive noises.

All in all, it’s been our most challenging week collaboratively, but I’ve been really impressed with our ability to move past the tough times and learn how to communicate more effectively. I’ve definitely learned a lot about the creative process with other designers, and I think this is a project we’re all going to have pride in due to the obstacles we’ve chosen to overcome.